Throne of Glass – Review

Throne of Glass – Review

Hello dearies,

This is the second review I’m writing, and just like the previous I won’t be rating the book from 1 to 5 stars. I don’t believe in rating because I think it’s super subjective. What might be a five for me, may be a three for you and you might have enjoyed it the same way, though your critics might be towards something else.

Therefore, I will only write how the book made me feel and the things I liked about it, instead of just writing a synopsis of it.

Here we go:

Book: Throne of Glass by Sarah J. Maas

Genre: Fantasy

I’ve been meaning to read this book for a while, since I’ve seen so many reviews and pictures of it (I love book instagrams). It was a fast read for me; I wouldn’t put the book down, and got really hooked in the story. We follow a young trained assassin, Celaena Sardothien,  through a life-death contest to become the King of Adarlan’s Champion, and with that winning her freedom (she’s been on a slave camp for a over year). I expected a lot more action from this book, since the real juice only started to appear on the second half of the story. I think the writer lost way too much time with love triangles that are poorly developed (I’m a little tired of love triangles) and frivolous conversations, instead of showing more of the assassins ability and strength (sometimes she came out a little too whiny making me wonder how did she became the best assassin of the Kingdom). For example, the contest is designed with many tests, but we only read a few of them, others are just skimmed through.

With that being said, I liked the character development, since we learn she is not just a cold hearted assassin, but more of a girl that was thrown into this world and had to do anything to survive. We see her starting to care for other people than herself, which shows that her soul is way more human than what people thought of her. The end leaves you wanting to understand more, since some important information lightly appears towards the final chapters. Who is she? Who is her family? How powerful is she? We start to learn that there is a big secret around her, and the author is pretty clever at giving bits and pieces of information throughout the story that the reader must connect. Instead of throwing everything at once, she kind of turns us into little detectives, trying to figure out what is actually going on, before the heroin does.

I definitely recommend reading it, it is a well-developed story, that catches your attention from beginning to end and definitely makes you want more. The author did a great job at creating this new universe, with different customs, religion and history. I loved the writing style and her POV choice. I’ve grow very accustomed to first person POV, so it was a nice break from it. The way she writes is smooth, simple, yet it fits the genre, setting, and atmosphere of the book perfectly. I’m already on my way to get the second book of the series, since I have to kill my curiosity.

Have you read Throne of Glass? What were your thoughts on it?

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A Book is a Book: Literary Vs. Commercial

A Book is a Book: Literary Vs. Commercial

Hello everyone,

What do you see in the picture? Books, right? A book means someone (the author) is trying to give you a message. Trying to transport you to a different place, time, or simply to make you see your own world in a different point of view. The whole purpose of a book is simply to give you a message, to make you think critically, or to make you stop thinking about your daily life, and just drown within its pages. The same for a movie, play, music, painting, or any form of art that triggers something inside you.

But I was astonished to discover over the weekend, while I was taking a self-publishing course, that here in Brazil some books are not considered Literature, because they are more commercial or because their writing style isn’t as refined as others. I felt like these types of books were underestimated, as if they weren’t as good or valued as the others.

I always thought we had one Young-Adult genre, where all the sub-genres derived from, however, we have a Literary YA, and a commercial YA. (The names are different in Portuguese but won’t change the meaning of what I’m saying.) So where does this in-between commercial YA lies? Why Brazilians are not publishing Young-Adult novels that are not so refined (but still sends you a message clearly), and are more commercial? Most of the books we consume here are Young-Adult novels that come from english speaking countries, however, we ourselves are not writing them.

Doesn’t a book still have the same value even if it’s simply entertaining, and not didactic or refined, or stylistic more polished? I believe that books, no matter what genre, should all have the same value, because they are all trying to teach you something, entertain you, or make you feel something. The more rules we put on how books should look like, the less people will read it, because they will stay within one category. A book is supposed to make you feel fun, silly, courageous, strong, vulnerable, and intelligent. Just like we have different moods and tastes, so should books. Yes, some people think that YA books are silly or for teenagers, but they still make me feel good. Isn’t that the whole point of reading something? Having a good time?

If we want to stop complaining that the new generation doesn’t read that many books, why don’t we stop discriminating books in the first place? If it makes you feel happy, whole, and overall satisfied that is all that matters.

Don’t give up reading,

Fefe.