5 Things I learned from Acting School

5 Things I learned from Acting School

Hello everyone,

I went to acting school when I was only nineteen years old, in a completely different country, and had to re-start my life over there. It was a great experience, first time alone, in a country with different language, different culture, no parents, nor anyone to solve my problems. Let’s say it was a crucial time to shape me into the woman I am today. I have come to discover who I really am, because I had the time and permission to do so.

So here they are, the five things I learned in acting school that I will take with me for life: Ready? ACTION!

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  1. Engage with people, and learn to listen.

When someone (the cashier at the grocery store for example) asks you “How are you?” Really take time to answer. We usually say, “I’m fine, and you?” And thats it. Engage them on conversation. After one of my teacher told me that, I started doing this all the time. Eventually everyone knew me at my local Grocery Store because I always engaged them in conversation. It’s so automatic now that sometimes I don’t even realize I’m doing it. Take time to really know people, it will make a difference, and really LISTEN.

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     2. Fail, fail again, but fail better. 

I believe is one of the most important things for me to remember. One of my teachers used to say that if we felt like we failed at the scene, we should do it again, but do it better. If you failed the scene again, you should keep going, because each try would only be better than the last, and we would always learn something. This is so important to use in our daily lives, when applying for a new job, working out, or trying something you are afraid of. Just take a chance, and keep fighting. Failure is just one step away from success.

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  3. Write your experiences.

They always encouraged us to keep journals. We should write our experiences, write what we see, write about people we see in the street, write about anything, actually. When we write, we are doing a study of the Human psych, and in acting we need to understand humans. We need to know how different people feel, react, their objectives in life, etc… So, I’m really trying to work on writing more what I see.

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  4. Respect each other’s background.

In my class we had people from all over the world, with different ages, cultures, colors, languages, and background. We had to share some pretty personal things in order to learn how to trust each other (which could only make a scene better), and to be vulnerable. I got to learn great stories, as well as sad ones from so many people, and that taught me we shouldn’t judge someone based on what we think we know. We don’t know each other’s past and struggle. We can only be supportive of one another.

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      5. Do not compare yourself with others.

This one is a biggie for me, because I am terrible at it. We learned that we shouldn’t compare ourselves to others because everyone was different, with a different strength or talent. We could only compare ourselves with ourselves, because that was the only way we would see our true growth. If you compare where you are to where others are, you will end up frustrated. But if you stop to realize how much you improved, you will feel the fire to keep improving. That is a must for anything in life: health, body image, personal projects, work etc. Do not compare yourself with others. Only you can be the true measure of your growth. You will always be enough, because no one else can be a better you than you.

CUT!

What did you think of my 5 lessons from acting school? Make sure to leave a comment!

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A Book is a Book: Literary Vs. Commercial

A Book is a Book: Literary Vs. Commercial

Hello everyone,

What do you see in the picture? Books, right? A book means someone (the author) is trying to give you a message. Trying to transport you to a different place, time, or simply to make you see your own world in a different point of view. The whole purpose of a book is simply to give you a message, to make you think critically, or to make you stop thinking about your daily life, and just drown within its pages. The same for a movie, play, music, painting, or any form of art that triggers something inside you.

But I was astonished to discover over the weekend, while I was taking a self-publishing course, that here in Brazil some books are not considered Literature, because they are more commercial or because their writing style isn’t as refined as others. I felt like these types of books were underestimated, as if they weren’t as good or valued as the others.

I always thought we had one Young-Adult genre, where all the sub-genres derived from, however, we have a Literary YA, and a commercial YA. (The names are different in Portuguese but won’t change the meaning of what I’m saying.) So where does this in-between commercial YA lies? Why Brazilians are not publishing Young-Adult novels that are not so refined (but still sends you a message clearly), and are more commercial? Most of the books we consume here are Young-Adult novels that come from english speaking countries, however, we ourselves are not writing them.

Doesn’t a book still have the same value even if it’s simply entertaining, and not didactic or refined, or stylistic more polished? I believe that books, no matter what genre, should all have the same value, because they are all trying to teach you something, entertain you, or make you feel something. The more rules we put on how books should look like, the less people will read it, because they will stay within one category. A book is supposed to make you feel fun, silly, courageous, strong, vulnerable, and intelligent. Just like we have different moods and tastes, so should books. Yes, some people think that YA books are silly or for teenagers, but they still make me feel good. Isn’t that the whole point of reading something? Having a good time?

If we want to stop complaining that the new generation doesn’t read that many books, why don’t we stop discriminating books in the first place? If it makes you feel happy, whole, and overall satisfied that is all that matters.

Don’t give up reading,

Fefe.

Poem Moment

Poem Moment

I was going through my journal and found an old poem I wrote two years ago. It made me realize how some things might seem that will destroy you, as if you wouldn’t be able to pass through it. But then, time passes and you are okay, and whole again. We need to remember that we don’t need to put our faith or happiness on people. They should be part of it, and grow from it, but they shouldn’t be the source of it. We need to learn how to be complete on our own, so people will come and share their “complete” with you, and more and more will be added to who you are.

With that being said, I am sharing the poem I wrote, because even if it’s not a part of who I am anymore, it was a part of me for quite some time. Some people might see themselves in the poem, or recognize feelings they are having. So, for those who do I say, “It’s okay, you will get through whatever is haunting your soul, and it won’t kill you. It will make you stronger.”

Unnamed Poem:

To say okay, when you are not okay

To smile, when you want to cry

To pretend you don’t care, when you do

It’s all a mask, it’s all a lie

It’s a cry for help that you are failing to see

I’m hurting inside, how can it be?

That you neglect me when I’m near

Don’t try to find me when I disappear

But if I do, would you miss me?

Or shed a tear and move on quickly

When I would break if you ever left me. 

 

I didn’t break. I’m still here, and so are all of you.

Love,

Fefe

13 Reasons Why Review

13 Reasons Why Review

For quite a while, I’ve been deciding whether or not I should post this review of the TV series: 13 Reasons Why.

Some of you may know that the opinions on the show have been pretty controversial, so here goes my personal opinion:

I agree that the show has flaws, since it doesn’t teach people how to help someone that has been experiencing depression, and suicidal thoughts. And yes, the show does romanticize the suicide theme, however, that’s what most shows and movies do: Breaking Bad with the drug business, How To Get Away With Murder with crimes, Beauty and the Beast with Stockholm Syndrome, and so on.

Despite all of this, I actually enjoyed the show. I experienced bullying myself from the age of eight till the age of fourteen, and like Hannah I felt lost, alone, and misunderstood. Also, just like Hannah, my bullies didn’t see what they were doing as mean and disrespectful, and some may even be reading me right now, and still not realize that what they did was hurtful. Unlike Hannah, I didn’t experience things as mean or belittling, because at a young age the jokes and cruelties were more childish. Thankfully, I always had great support from my mother, who knew everything that was happening, and who supported me, and fought for me. Looking back, I know I have changed so much, and I also learned that are tougher things in life, and somehow my strength was built from it.

With that being said, I am still against bullying, because, while some people might grow from it, other mights be crushed from it. We are different people, and we react differently to situations, so people can’t expect that everyone will move on and brush it off. So, I think the importance of the show is to teach people how little things they do matter, and how a joke, a rumor, or name calling can be damaging to others.

The show also approaches very sensitive and taboo subjects, such as rape, which is extremely important to discuss, since a high number of women–being a teenager or an older woman- experiences it, and feels judged, dirty, and victim marked by the tragedy. 13 Reasons Why shows the extent of the problem, and really shocks his viewers with the violence that it is, so people will understand that it’s not a subject that can be ignored.

For people who want to see it, I suggest you do it carefully. For those in a healthy state of mind watching it can be a learning experience, but to those who are going through a depression the show might shock you in a way that won’t be helpful. If you are struggling with something, I encourage you to seek help. Even if only one person is by your side that’s all the strength you need. Also, you are stronger than you think, and you are not alone.

Writer’s Block

Writer’s Block

Hello peeps,

Long time no see.

It’s funny how easily we can get caught in the rush of life and forget to work on our personal projects, isn’t it?

Every week I set for myself the goal of sitting and working on my blog, and every week something else came up, something that it would be more important or more urgent, or let’s be honest, I was just tired and didn’t want to think. Who hasn’t felt that way, right?

Also, lately I haven’t been in touch with my creative side. In other words, I’ve been feeling a massive writer’s block, and haven’t been able to shake that feeling off.

I keep saying to myself, “don’t worry, you will write when you feel creative again.” But that just doesn’t happen. You know why? Because writing is a craft. It’s like a muscle that you have to keep exercising to get stronger, even on those days that you feel lazy and not wanting to go to the gym. So the best way to push past this block is to get back at exercising my writing muscle, which is what brings me here today.

I just need to remember to be patient with myself, because the strength and ability won’t come right away. So, today I just wanted to tell you that it’s okay to sometimes feel blocked, or uninspired, or set you personal projects aside for a while. As long as you don’t get stuck in that loop and don’t put yourself together to pull you out of it.

Take a breath, accept that this things happen, but don’t get used to the feeling, work you way back to focusing on you and your goals. And don’t forget, be patient.

Much love,

Fefe